NEWS

October’s Show at The Modbo: “blu” romanodaniel

October’s Show at The Modbo: “blu” romanodaniel

The Modbo is honored to present October’s First Friday: “blu” romanodaniel, showcasing dynamic pieces by local artist Daniel Romano.  The opening reception is from 5:00 pm until midnight on Friday, October 4th. The show runs through Friday, October 25th, with a free artist talk that evening at 5:30 pm. In addition to the opening reception, the gallery is open on Friday evenings from 4-7 pm or by appointment.  The Modbo is located in the Arts Alley in downtown Colorado Springs at 17C E. Bijou. Find the stretch of Bijou that is between Cascade and Tejon, and go south down the alley. Street parking is available, but The Modbo recommends the lot on Cascade just north of Bijou, which is only $1 after 3 pm. The Modbo can be reached at themodbo@gmail.com, themodbo.com, or 633-4240. 

This collection includes sculpture, sculptural relief on painted panels, and the popular EYEBOX series. Romano has selected part of this collection as a narrative of recent social issues he has felt compelled to respond to with art. The remaining pieces in the collection simply intrigue the senses or are depictions of anatomy, and include  a large, fresh sculpture which Romano has been developing since 2012. The show “blu” romanodaniel is intriguing, thought-provoking, current, and fresh.

Daniel Romano is a self-taught Colorado based artist who works in fabricated metal sculpture, relief, and painting.  Other projects include No 6 Billiard table, landscape installations, and architectural installations including N3 taphouse in Colorado Springs. Born in Colorado 1966, Daniel began studying sculpture at 16 with woodcarving.  He was later drawn to working with metal, a material which can be welded, formed, pigmented. He also enjoys working with concrete and painting. He continues to grow his skill set and explore new mediums. Daniel has work in collections across the U.S., South America, and Asia and recently produced work for Louis Vuitton as well as medallions (FAC Visionaries) for the Fine Art Center.

 

Art Purge: A One Night Art Sale at Kreuser Gallery!

Art Purge: A One Night Art Sale at Kreuser Gallery!

Kreuser Gallery, in collaboration with G44 Gallery and The Modbo, presents “Art Purge,” a one night sale of art from the inventory of local art collectors. 

Gallery owners Abby Kreuser, Gundega Stevens, and Lauren Ciborowski were approached by some of their most devoted art buyers to create a unique sales opportunity in the hopes of solving a distinctive problem– freeing up some wall space! Don’t miss this unique opportunity to peruse and purchase art. You could see something you wish you had bought years ago, or fall in love with a new-to-you piece! But mark your calendars now– this sale happens just once, and just for a few hours!

Please join us at Kreuser Gallery at 125 E. Boulder Street on Saturday, September 28th.  The art will be on display beginning at noon, with a reception from 5 pm until 8 pm. For more information, Kreuser Gallery can be reached at  719.464.5880, kreusergallery@gmail.com, www.abigailkreusergallery.com, or https://www.facebook.com/kreusergallery

September’s Show at The Modbo: In Memoriam: Works by the Late Laurel Swab

September’s Show at The Modbo: In Memoriam: Works by the Late Laurel Swab

The Modbo is honored to present September’s First Friday: “In Memoriam: Works by the Late Laurel Swab.”  Swab was a talented and prolific local artist with a masterful grip on surrealism. She died in September of 2018 after an eight month battle with leukemia.  A celebration of her life and talent, this show will feature work both for sale and from private collections. The opening reception is from 5:00 pm until midnight on Friday, September 6th.  The show runs through Friday, September 27th. In addition to the opening reception, the gallery is open on Friday evenings from 4-7 pm or by appointment. The Modbo is located in the Arts Alley in downtown Colorado Springs at 17C E. Bijou. Find the stretch of Bijou that is between Cascade and Tejon, and go south down the alley. Street parking is available, but The Modbo recommends the lot on Cascade just north of Bijou, which is only $1 after 3 pm. The Modbo can be reached at themodbo@gmail.com, themodbo.com, or 633-4240. 

Laurel Ellen Swab was born on June 30th,1969, in Louisville, Kentucky. She lived most of her life in Colorado Springs, Colorado. She chose Kansas City Art Institute for her college education. After sampling graphic design and sculpture, she graduated with honors with a degree in Fiber Arts. After graduation, she worked for the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center where she was their exhibits preparator. She was a self-taught sculptor, mastering many materials and techniques. After a trip to Italy she turned to painting and soon became accomplished in the figurative, still life, surrealism and portraiture genres. She was also a muralist, illuminating the walls and ceilings of several homes of prominent residents of the city. In 2012, she married Austin Cole Hartman and took up residence on 20 acres of beautiful land between the towns of Cripple Creek and Guffey. Laurel began designing and making jewelry.  She and Austin developed a passion for Colorado gemstones and crystals. Together they prospected their mineral claims for topaz, aquamarine, amazonite, smoky quartz and fluorite. Laurel faceted gems from topaz, aquamarine, and smoky quartz and others. On September 9, 2018, Laurel lost her eight month-long battle against leukemia. 

 

August’s Show at The Modbo: Floyd D. Tunson: Works on Paper

August’s Show at The Modbo: Floyd D. Tunson: Works on Paper

The Modbo presents August’s First Friday: “Floyd D. Tunson: Works on Paper.”  The opening reception is from 5:00 pm until midnight on Friday, August 2nd, with live music by My Name is Harriett at 7 and 9 pm.  The show runs through Friday, August 30th. In addition to the opening reception, the gallery is open on Friday evenings from 4-7 pm or by appointment.  The Modbo is located in the Arts Alley in downtown Colorado Springs at 17C E. Bijou. Find the stretch of Bijou that is between Cascade and Tejon, and go south down the alley. Street parking is available, but The Modbo recommends the lot on Cascade just north of Bijou, which is only $1 after 3 pm. The Modbo can be reached at themodbo@gmail.com, themodbo.com, or 633-4240.

Of all the traditional tools and evolving technologies available to an artist, there’s only one that Floyd D. Tunson cannot do without: “Just give me a pencil,” he says, “because drawing is the basis of everything I do.”  For the work in this show, that “pencil” is a Uni-ball pen. And what sounds simple is simply not. The process is tricky, given the tension between control and inhibition – a sort of Hamlet dilemma, in which “thinking too precisely on th’ event,” can result in “one part wisdom and ever three parts coward.” Since a direct ink-drawn image on paper can’t be cleaned up the way a pencil drawing or a painted canvas can, the strokes have to be thoughtful, but freedom for happy coincidence has to be allowed. This dialectic is evident in the totality of the work, where certain drawings seem more tightly controlled than others, although each piece relies on the tension. A close viewing of each is a chance to follow the artist’s hand – the hesitations, the exuberance, the energy.

In the Kabuki Knot series, the composition is architectural, but creating it is a completely intuitive process. When Tunson sets pen to paper, he allows an innate sense of design to automatically compose a continuous image. In the Monsters series, the details are calculated to suggest that these despots and demons are scarcely exaggerations of the diabolical forces at work in the world.

Concepts, calculation, accidents, experience – all come into play in the process as the artist hopes for a wow.

Born in Denver in 1947, Floyd D. Tunson has worked over forty years in drawing, photography, painting, mixed media, sculpture, and installation. In 1971, after serving in the Army, he began a teaching career in Colorado Springs. In 1998 he earned an MA degree from Adams State College.  Tunson has exhibited throughout the Rocky Mountain region, including at the Robischon Gallery (Denver), Redline Gallery (Denver), Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center at Colorado College, Denver Art Museum, Yellowstone Art Museum, Arvada Art Center, University of Colorado, 516 Arts (Albuquerque), and the Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art. Certain of his work draws from his experience as an African-American male; other work reflects a broad view of the world, including global politics, art history, and beauty for beauty’s sake. In 2012-2013, Son of Pop, a forty-year retrospective, was hosted by the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center. In 2018, he exhibited new work for the premier of the Marie Walsh Sharpe Gallery at the Ent Center for the Arts. In 2013, Tunson was the subject of a video interview by Rocky Mountain PBS. He has been reviewed in Westword, the Denver Post, Art Ltd, and Art Forum.

July’s First Friday at The Modbo: In Your Face, New Works by Carol Dass and Heather Oelklaus

July’s First Friday at The Modbo: In Your Face, New Works by Carol Dass and Heather Oelklaus

The Modbo presents July’s First Friday: “In Your Face” with recent works by Carol Dass and Heather Oelklaus.  The opening reception is from 5:00 pm until midnight on Friday, July 5th. The show runs through Friday, June 26th. In addition to the opening reception, the gallery is open on Friday evenings from 4-7 pm or by appointment.  The Modbo is located in the Arts Alley in downtown Colorado Springs at 17C E. Bijou. Find the stretch of Bijou that is between Cascade and Tejon, and go south down the alley. Street parking is available, but The Modbo recommends the lot on Cascade just north of Bijou, which is only $1 after 3 pm. The Modbo can be reached at themodbo@gmail.com, themodbo.com, or 633-4240.

“In Your Face,” recent works by Carol Dass and Heather Oelklaus, asks the viewer to be engaged with their provocative exhibition. From looking upward towards Dass’ cyanotype underpants as if you were a child experiencing a surreal clothesline, to sporting a pair of red and blue anaglyph glasses to witness Oelklaus’ true 3D world, these two Colorado Springs artists invite you to question and experience the works on display. Historic photographic image making pushes forward the ideals of the past and challenges the viewer to consider what has changed in the last one hundred years. Dass’ dreamlike cyanotype installation alongside Oelklaus’ old school virtual reality is visually and conceptually rich.

Carol Dass has been looking at the world through a camera’s viewfinder for as long as she can remember. Recently retired from teaching darkroom based photography at the University of Colorado Colorado Springs for 14 years, Carol lives with her husband and two dogs. When not traveling with her 91 year old muse and mother, Carol collects and researches vernacular photography. Carol’s work is in the collections of The Denver Art Museum, The Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, The Progressive Art Collection and various private collections.

Heather Oelklaus (b. 1972, USA) studied Sculpture at The Kansas City Art Institute (KCAI) in the early 1990s. She has exhibited work in solo and group shows in Colorado, New Orleans, Oregon, New York, Texas, and Arizona. Heather lives and works in Colorado Springs where she explores unconventional photography and art making. A variety of photographic techniques such as anaglyph, chemigram, photogram, lumen prints, wet plate collodion, pinhole photography, cyanotype, and light painting are influential in her art making. Photography as an object instead of the traditional reproduced image influences Heather’s art with themes of family, social and gender roles, and abstract art.

June’s First Friday at The Modbo: “Catalytic” by Jeremy Grant and “Arrival” by Jeffrey de Mers

June’s First Friday at The Modbo: “Catalytic” by Jeremy Grant and “Arrival” by Jeffrey de Mers

The Modbo presents June’s First Friday: “Catalytic” by Jeremy Grant and “Arrival” by Jeffrey de Mers.  The opening reception is from 5:00 pm until midnight on Friday, June 7th. The show runs through Friday, June 28th. In addition to the opening reception, the gallery is open on Friday evenings from 4-7 pm or by appointment.  The Modbo is located in the Arts Alley in downtown Colorado Springs at 17C E. Bijou. Find the stretch of Bijou that is between Cascade and Tejon, and go south down the alley. Street parking is available, but The Modbo recommends the lot on Cascade just north of Bijou, which is only $1 after 3 pm. The Modbo can be reached at themodbo@gmail.com, themodbo.com, or 633-4240.

Jeremy Grant (b. 1985) received a B.S. in Design and Illustration from John Brown University in 2007 and currently lives in Denver, CO. Grant has exhibited his collage and assemblage work in individual and group shows regularly since 2008. His dense, maximalist paper collages create emotional and associative landscapes, using deconstructed and re-contextualized elements to bridge chaos and familiarity.

Grant’s collages are dense and richly layered emotional and associative landscapes meant to bridge chaos and familiarity by using collage elements based on their associative attributes – relying on texture, color, and form rather than object. Compositionally, his work creates visual rhythms and movements meant to mirror mental contemplation and evoke a particular pathos or state of mind. Thematically, Grant engages with the human emotional experience; simultaneously dealing in juxtapositions of comfort and chaos, scarcity and abundance, decay and new life.

Jeffrey de Mers was born and raised in Colorado Springs. As a child, he was enamored of works by local artists like C.H. Rockey and Starr Kempf; their pieces stoked the flames of his imagination. Later in life, influences of surrealist artists like Max Ernst and Joan Miro crept in, giving rise to the works on display here. Some pieces are more deterministic in their presentation, while others are decidedly not, encouraging the viewer to come into a greater correspondence with the piece.

It has been over a decade since de Mers has had a show in Colorado Springs, having lived for nearly a decade in the San Luis Valley. This show is a collection of pieces from the last seven years or so. After a divorce, the sale of a house, and some up close and personal experiences with death, these pieces reflect a sense of rebirth and finding rainbows in the shadows of life.

Sträs Plays The Modbo: An Evening of Modern Jazz

The Modbo presents an eclectic night of modern jazz with Sträs, comprised of phenomenally talented Denver area musicians Paul Riola, Joshua Trinidad, Kim Stone, Ian Argys, and Michel Stahli. Friday, April 26th, doors at 7:00, show at 7:30 pm. Just a $7-10 donation.  The Modbo is located in the Arts Alley in downtown Colorado Springs at 17C E. Bijou. Find the stretch of Bijou that is between Cascade and Tejon, and go south down the alley. Street parking is available, but The Modbo recommends the lot on Cascade just north of Bijou, which is only $1 after 3 pm. The Modbo can be reached at themodbo@gmail.com, themodbo.com, or 633-4240.

May’s First Friday at The Modbo: Piece of Work, a group sculptural show

May’s First Friday at The Modbo: Piece of Work, a group sculptural show

The Modbo presents May’s First Friday: Piece of Work, a group sculptural show featuring: Larry Kledzik, Sean O’Meallie, Wendy Mike, Daniel Romano, and Phil Vallejo.  The opening reception is from 5:00 pm until midnight on Friday, May 3rd. The show runs through Friday, May 31st. In addition to the opening reception, the gallery is open on Friday evenings from 4-7 pm or by appointment.  The Modbo is located in the Arts Alley in downtown Colorado Springs at 17C E. Bijou. Find the stretch of Bijou that is between Cascade and Tejon, and go south down the alley. Street parking is available, but The Modbo recommends the lot on Cascade just north of Bijou, which is only $1 after 3 pm. The Modbo can be reached at themodbo@gmail.com, themodbo.com, or 633-4240.

Artist bios:

Larry Kledzik studied at the Chicago Academy of Fine Art.  He started painting in 1963 in a surrealistic vein which has never entirely abandoned its influence, even when he moved to Colorado in 1973 to paint landscapes.  It just went underground. In the 1990s, he started making installation art. This format enabled an integration of the aesthetic and philosophical material he had been digesting over this span of time, resulting in a unified body of work continuing into the present and reflected in these current pieces.

Sean O’Meallie has a background in higher education and toy invention, but is known for creating eye-catching thought provoking painted wood sculptures. His sculptures are held in numerous public, private and museum collections, and have been toured in the U.S. and Europe. His work is included in Launching the Imagination, a university teaching text on art and design. Cowboy Pajamas, a 20’ painted bronze sculpture of an abstracted cowboy with his guns drawn is located in downtown Denver, and he is the creator of The Manitou Chair Project. Additional public commissions include Balloon Man Running, a 32’ tall permanent sculpture of a running balloon figure for the RTD Central Park Station in Denver, CO., which was named Best New Public Artwork of 2017 by Denver’s Westword newspaper.  O’Meallie’s work has won numerous awards and recognitions.

Wendy Mike is a Colorado Springs artist who lived and trained in San Francisco and New York City. She founded FutureSelf: Youth Discovering Success Through Art, a not-for-profit providing youth at-risk with life changing workshops and programs, and was the executive director for eight years. Although she continues to facilitate arts-based organizational trainings, most of her time is spent in her downtown studio creating figurative sculpture for installations and exhibits. Her recent installation, Ragnarök Anthropocene, with co-artist De Lane Bredvik at the Colorado Springs Fine Art Center at Colorado College, won the Pikes Peak Arts Council’s Best Gallery Exhibit in 2017.

Daniel Romano is an artist working with formed metal and painting. He began developing metalworking techniques in 2000, working on realistic forms.

Phil Vallejo, a Colorado Springs native born 1959, is a painter, sculptor and mural artist who was an early participant in the Pueblo Levee Mural Project. A student of Floyd Tunson, Bill Burgess and Nick Latka, he graduated from Palmer High & studied Fine Arts for two years at CSU Pueblo, where his outdoor sculpture “3 Fold Education” is on permanent exhibit.   Phil’s emotionally charged abstract paintings & sculptures have been exhibited at the Pirate & Core galleries in Denver as well as the Modbo, Cottonwood, Bridge & Kreuser galleries in Colorado Springs. He has numerous works in private collections throughout the United States & Mexico.

Artist Statements:

Larry Kledzik:

“Attrition” is part of a series of individual works under the heading “FAULT” which is a sub series of my larger installational series “Diet.”  These are individual pieces which can be interspaced between the installations as they occur and focus on some core aspect of the larger picture being addressed in the installations.  This format first appeared in the mid 1990s in my installation “RATS” and were designated “Wall Monstrosities” after their initial title. There were only a few pieces I considered to be true “Wall Monstrosities” but the formal aspect of a sculptural back board with protruding elements has continued as a motif into the present.  My second piece, “Number Two,” takes the form of a “sculpture in the round.” Most of my standing sculptures are placed against a wall, but a number of them take this form also. “Number Two” is what I refer to as a “Closed Conceptual Circle,” a new term I have coined specifically for this piece. “Attrition” and “Number Two” share a subtle affinity that I am still in the process of assessing in relation to the rest of my work.

Sean O’Meallie:

The similarities between sausages and smiles blows his mind, he said. This work is about the semiotics of spatial occupation and recognition of opportunity, one knows. He seems to be obsessed with sausages and smiles. One knows his work is usually painted wood; that it takes time to do; blah, blah, blah… trees, and all that. Why he would affix things to the ceiling is puzzling, but it is fresh. One thinks the word “decor” may be referencing the decorating of things, like cupcakes, and now ceilings. One knows a lot of places of worship have decorated ceilings. He’s said he sees dichotomy in everything, but how that relates to this work is not clear to this writer. His work is so touchable. It makes one smile a couple of ways. Impish.

Wendy Mike:

Wendy’s participation in various art forms, (dance, singing and acting as well as visual art) inspires a fascination with the whole human form: the shapes of muscles, bones, the quality of skin, the body in motion and as the container of the soul. Traditional sculptural materials, such as bronze or stone, seem too heavy. Lately she has been sculpting with recycled fabric and hand-made paper, creating forms that are as weightless as possible, yet still capture the essence of the human vessel.  What if art had the capacity to bypass the intellect and go straight to the heart? Would new ways of thinking and feeling emerge? Could transformation be possible? This potential urges her on.

Dan Romano:

Presently his work is abstract figurative forms, he feels compelled to speak about the media and social issues with symbolism, and written narrative

Phil Vallejo:

This small body of work represents Phil’s angst about the current administration and how they’re destroying democracy & dividing the nation. He hopes for change in 2020.

My Name is Harriett with Swelter and Burn

My Name is Harriett with Swelter and Burn

The Modbo is delighted to present a rare night of live music with My Name is Harriett and Swelter and Burn on Friday, March 29th.  Doors at 7:30, show at 8. $7 suggested donation. Swelter and Burn is an R-rated comedic piano duet team– they sing about sanctimonious yogis and sexting, and they promise they are very, very funny.  They’ll be opening for My Name is Harriett– Harriett’s soaring vocals and exquisite violin playing and looping will leave you aching for more.

The Modbo is a small art gallery and events space located in the Arts Alley in downtown Colorado Springs at 17C E. Bijou. Find the stretch of Bijou that is between Cascade and Tejon, and go south down the alley. Street parking is available, but The Modbo recommends the lot on Cascade just north of Bijou, which is only $1 after 3 pm. The Modbo can be reached at themodbo@gmail.com, themodbo.com, or 633-4240.

More about Harriett:

Harriett Landrum has been playing the violin for the last twenty-eight years. She has enjoyed teaching music privately to over twenty students for twelve years. Notably, she has made a modest career as a singer and songstress under the moniker “My Name Is Harriett”. She weaves her interest with the English language, having her heart broken, and her ability to play the violin into songs. Songs that have made young men tear up. Songs that have helped ladies move on. Songs that have given voice to issues that she herself needed to purge.  Harriett continues to improve, explore and indulge her affectivity for prose and music.

 

April’s First Friday at The Modbo: Monstro, Monstras, Monstrat by Nethery Wylie

April’s First Friday at The Modbo: Monstro, Monstras, Monstrat by Nethery Wylie

The Modbo presents April’s First Friday: Monstro, Monstras, Monstrat by Nethery Wylie.  The opening reception is from 5:00 pm until midnight on Friday, April 5th. The show runs through Friday, April 26th. There will be a free artist’s talk at 5 pm on Friday, April 26th.  The Modbo is located in the Arts Alley in downtown Colorado Springs at 17C E. Bijou. Find the stretch of Bijou that is between Cascade and Tejon, and go south down the alley. Street parking is available, but The Modbo recommends the lot on Cascade just north of Bijou, which is only $1 after 3 pm. The Modbo can be reached at themodbo@gmail.com, themodbo.com, or 633-4240.

About the show:

St. Francis—Il Povarello—he who sought to “follow barefoot the barefoot Christ”—sells for about $87 at better garden stores in the US. In Monstro, Mostras, Monstrat, Nethery Wylie explores iconic images that are both durable yet ironically changeable. Francis of Assisi’s personal turning point was embracing the leper who disgusted him. Clare of Assisi wished to follow Francis into the world but had to accept enclosure in a nunnery as the price of founding the Order of the Poor Clares. And Circe the Witch? Is she the ultimate conniving female malevolence? Or just a girl.

About the artist:

Nethery came to art practice after a lifetime of trying to make words communicate mental pictures. Now she struggles with the opposite: making visual art out of ideas gathered from the many books and essays layered in her mind. She works predominantly in oil or mixed media painting but often transfers and layers images onto fabrics, glass and other materials. She completed an MFA in 2014. She also holds an MA in History and is a professional librarian. Nethery maintains a studio Old Midland School in Colorado Springs.