NEWS

I was, I am, I will be: New Work by Su Kaiden Cho

I was, I am, I will be: New Work by Su Kaiden Cho

The Modbo presents “I was, I am, I will be,” an exhibition of fascinating mixed media by contemporary artist Su Kaiden Cho.  The opening reception is from 5 pm until 9 pm on Friday, October 1st.  Cho explores in the combination of Asian art with contemporary art to portray the traditional Korean silk wrapping (Bojagi) and its abstract form as a metaphor for coverings of how we lose ourselves, what we keep inside, and how it is reflected. As of this writing, masks are suggested for unvaccinated viewers.  The show runs through Friday, October 29th. In addition to the opening reception, the gallery is happily open by appointment.  The Modbo is located in the Arts Alley in downtown Colorado Springs at 17C E. Bijou. Find the stretch of Bijou that is between Cascade and Tejon, and go south down the alley. Street parking is available, but The Modbo recommends the lot on Cascade just north of Bijou. The Modbo can be reached at themodbo@gmail.com, themodbo.com, or 633-4240.

About the Show:

Su Kaiden Cho condenses a central belief that lies at the core of his artistic practice by delving into issues of ethnic liminality by means of quality of ambiguity or disorientation of identity. Cho’s series of “I was,” “I am,” “I will be,” are the connections to his heritage but are also reminders of the loss of identity he has had to endure. The first phrase “I was,” is dormant, because the past is fixed. You can’t change it and you can’t manipulate it in any way. The second phrase,“I was,” is present. In the present is the only time we need to center ourselves. As for the last, “I will be,” references moving forward to whatever may come into its life. Cho explores in the combination of Asian art with contemporary art to portray the traditional Korean silk wrapping (Bojagi) and its abstract form as a metaphor for coverings of how we lose ourselves, what we keep inside, and how it is reflected. Cho sees this exhibit as an opportunity for any viewers to fill in those phrases with their own experiences, and to take the time to reflect on their own life trajectory –Cho states that the truth is hardly ever on the surface, more often than not, the truth can only be found deep inside.

About the Artist:

Su Kaiden Cho was born and raised in Seoul, South Korea. Cho is a Korean contemporary artist and he now resides and works in Colorado. Cho’s oeuvre reconciles the identity challenges reflecting his life experiences caught in between South Korean customs and American mores. Cho received a Bachelor of Arts in Interdisciplinary Arts Practices with emphasis in installation arts from University of Colorado, Colorado Springs. Cho has exhibited his work in numerous galleries in Colorado including solo exhibitions and artist in residency. Cho was shown as a featured artist in Gallery of Contemporary Arts, Colorado Springs, CO, Understudy, Denver, Colorado, Artworks Center for Contemporary Art, Loveland, Denver, installed public sculpture in Aurora, Colorado, and an award winning designer at the Fine Arts Center in Colorado Springs, CO.

Su Kaiden Cho condenses a central belief that lies at the core of his artistic practice by delving into issues of ethnic liminality by means of quality of ambiguity or disorientation of identity. Cho’s practice to bring in otherness, acceptance, challenging norms and inclusion. In his work, he confronts the derogatory terms and attitudes with which Cho continues to withstand today. His accoutrements are proud connections to his heritage but are also reminders of the loss of identity he has had to endure. Cho manipulates materials through the context of self-identity as he examines with social and cultural clashes between what is internally embraced and externally imposed, as it pertains to race and ethnic identity. Being considered a minority in this culture causes a level of uncertainty regarding his own identity and beauty. Cho’s work raises questions about common standpoints in how beauty is perceived that then ultimately results in internalized self-deprecation among minority races through visual duality, ambiguity, combing the association with the grotesque, the extreme and the fantastic —Cho states that the truth is hardly ever on the surface, more often than not, the truth can only be found deep inside.

My Scenery: Work by Byeongdoo Moon

My Scenery: Work by Byeongdoo Moon

The Modbo is surprised and delighted to host “My Scenery”– a last minute show of gorgeous sculptures by internationally renowned artist ByeongDoo Moon, accompanied by fascinating textile pieces by his wife, Hyewon Sim.  Although known locally for his large, beautiful outdoor pieces in downtown Colorado Springs, this show will instead feature smaller works by the artist.  The opening reception is from 5 pm until 9 pm on Friday, August 6th.  As of this writing, masks are suggested for unvaccinated viewers.  The show runs through Friday, August 27th. In addition to the opening reception, the gallery is happily open by appointment.  The Modbo is located in the Arts Alley in downtown Colorado Springs at 17C E. Bijou. Find the stretch of Bijou that is between Cascade and Tejon, and go south down the alley. Street parking is available, but The Modbo recommends the lot on Cascade just north of Bijou, which costs $3. The Modbo can be reached at themodbo@gmail.com, themodbo.com, or 633-4240.

Originally from South Korea, sculptor Byeongdoo Moon moved his family to Colorado Springs at the end of November.  Having exhibited numerous pieces in Colorado Springs’ Art on the Streets, he was moved by the city’s response to his work.  Most recently, his piece “Air or Water,” located at the Plaza of the Rockies building, was the third place winner for Art on the Streets.  Using stainless steel wire, Byeongdoo’s exquisitely crafted work speaks to the interdependence of humans and nature.  

June’s First Friday: Louis Rodriguez

June’s First Friday: Louis Rodriguez

The Modbo proudly presents June’s First Friday exhibit: “Experiments through Color Geometries and the Human Element,” featuring gorgeous paintings by Louis Rodriguez.  The opening reception is from 5 pm until 9 pm on Friday, June 4th.  Masks are no longer required for vaccinated people.  The show runs through Friday, June 25th. In addition to the opening reception, the gallery is open every Friday this month from 5-8 pm or by appointment.  The Modbo is located in the Arts Alley in downtown Colorado Springs at 17C E. Bijou. Find the stretch of Bijou that is between Cascade and Tejon, and go south down the alley. Street parking is available, but The Modbo recommends the lot on Cascade just north of Bijou, which costs $3. The Modbo can be reached at themodbo@gmail.com, themodbo.com, or 633-4240.

Louis Rodriguez is an artist and designer. His approach to painting is shaped by color, texture and contrast, which is evidenced in his current body of work. He favors the figurative form, abstraction, and landscapes and incorporates all three subjects in his painting. His journey and development as an artist has taken many twists and turns. From as far back as he can remember, he sensed art would be his lifelong adventure. The stops along the way have included design for advertising, commercial and fashion illustration, digital imaging, and a brief dabbling in motion graphics and video editing. “Moving forward in my commitment to art, into the next chapter of my life, represents a current state of expression focused from within and into the contemporary art world. It has been a deep personal quest and has become a determined lifelong endeavor to express the things that stir inside.” This is a natural process that is constantly evolving inside his core with self expression, enlightenment, and passionate love for contemporary art.

The Modbo’s Reopening in May: New Works by Lisa Deen

The Modbo’s Reopening in May: New Works by Lisa Deen

The Modbo is excited to reopen for May’s First Friday exhibit: New works by Lisa Deen, a beautiful show of linoleum block prints and paintings.  The opening reception is from 5 pm until 9 pm on Friday, May 7th.  Masks are still required.  The show runs through Friday, May 28th. In addition to the opening reception, the gallery is open by appointment.  The Modbo is located in the Arts Alley in downtown Colorado Springs at 17C E. Bijou. Find the stretch of Bijou that is between Cascade and Tejon, and go south down the alley. Street parking is available, but The Modbo recommends the lot on Cascade just north of Bijou, which costs $3. The Modbo can be reached at themodbo@gmail.com, themodbo.com, or 633-4240.

Lisa is an artist, wife, mother of twins, educator, and Westerner. Born in California, raised in Colorado, educated in Minnesota, she then circled back around for another go. Married in Denver, moved to Santa Barbara, and back to Colorado Springs. The geographic narrative and physical environment are imprinted on her visual vocabulary and personal aesthetic showing the strong influence of the landscape of the arid southwest. Lisa’s education includes a BA from St. Olaf College with majors in music and visual art and a MA from the University of Northern Colorado. A passionate art educator, she has taught workshops and classes for elementary through college students. Lisa currently teaches in the art department at Pikes Peak Community College. Her paintings and mixed media works have been exhibited in Minnesota, Oregon, California, New Mexico, and Colorado.

Artist Statement:

How many times have art lecturers said that artists hold up the mirror to the world? It always seems cliched and simplistic. Of course, there is more: self expression, ego, escape, desire. Maybe all when the work is honest. Two and a half years ago I began creating linoleum block prints of old trees. It was the perfect medium to express the sinewy, gnarled, textured trunks and limbs. Nearly dead and worn from wind and weather, all still had some small hold on life. A single branch or a protected corner that kept living and growing. I sought to express experience not merely representation. And then collaging the work with acrylic paintings, I explored the meditative and sublime. The work was quiet and reflective – a retreat and meditation. Loving this work, I dove deep into subtle color variations and imagery. A year ago, a pandemic took over our world. The stress and anxiety of the unknown, the separation from friends and family, the absence of social activities shocked my mind and heart. As the world became unrecognizable, The Old One at Palmer Park became nearly indecipherable in its complexity. As an introvert enjoying solitude last summer, I embarked on Roots in Color feeling freedom from expectation and planning. In the fall, Exposed took a look beneath the earth while becoming an expression of incredible sadness. Roots Exposed is anchored but uncomfortably balanced. Broken, the subject struck by lightning long ago, is a complex, layered mess of texture. My thoughtful, pre-pandemic lines and grids gave way to painting without direction – putting texture and color to surface in a desperate grasp for normalcy. Illuminated, the final work of the year, represents the moments when light penetrates the darkness.

The Modbo Goes on Hiatus

I’m sorry to say that I’ve decided to close temporarily due to COVID. My current plan is to open in February, but it’s of course impossible to promise. For me, the beauty of The Modbo lies in the interaction between the patrons and the artists, the patrons and the art, the art and the artists, etc. Online is a paltry facsimile for that model of art experience, and I’m frankly not up for a foray into that realm. This means that Small Works is unfortunately not happening this year. It would be a social distancing nightmare. I’m sure it’s possible, somehow, but it boggles the mind. Those of you who have experienced intake or opening night can imagine what I’m talking about here. Also, sales for Small Works have declined in the past few years, leading me to wonder about its ongoing relevancy and if it is still a worthwhile endeavor. I’ll update here when I decide to reopen, but regardless, stay safe and well, and remember that no matter what: You Need Art. Art Needs You.

Ruefully,

Lauren Ciborowski, Owner and Impresario

A Show Featuring All of the Unclaimed Art That Has Ended up in The Modbo Closet of Shame Since 2009

A Show Featuring All of the Unclaimed Art That Has Ended up in The Modbo Closet of Shame Since 2009

The Modbo is not too proud to present October’s First Friday exhibit: “All of the Unclaimed Art That Has Ended up in The Modbo Closet of Shame Since 2009.”  This is a show featuring all the unclaimed art that has ended up in The Modbo closet of shame since 2009.  The opening reception is from 5 pm until 8 pm on Friday,October 2nd.  During opening hours, guests must wear masks inside the space, and will only be allowed in a few people at a time.  The show runs through Friday, October 30th. In addition to the opening reception, the gallery is open by appointment or via personalized FaceTime tour.  The Modbo is located in the Arts Alley in downtown Colorado Springs at 17C E. Bijou. Find the stretch of Bijou that is between Cascade and Tejon, and go south down the alley. Street parking is available, but The Modbo recommends the lot on Cascade just north of Bijou, which is only $1 after 3 pm. The Modbo can be reached at themodbo@gmail.com, themodbo.com, or 633-4240.

Poems & Fragments: Art by Margaret Kasahara in September

Poems & Fragments: Art by Margaret Kasahara in September

The Modbo proudly presents September’s First Friday exhibit: “Poems & Fragments” by Margaret Kasahara.  The opening reception is from 5 pm until 8 pm on Friday, September 4th.  During opening hours, guests must wear masks inside the space, and will only be allowed in a few people at a time.  The show runs through Friday, September 25th. In addition to the opening reception, the gallery is open by appointment or via personalized FaceTime tour.  The Modbo is located in the Arts Alley in downtown Colorado Springs at 17C E. Bijou. Find the stretch of Bijou that is between Cascade and Tejon, and go south down the alley. Street parking is available, but The Modbo recommends the lot on Cascade just north of Bijou, which is only $1 after 3 pm. The Modbo can be reached at themodbo@gmail.com, themodbo.com, or 633-4240.

Margaret Kasahara was born in New York City, raised in Boulder, Colorado and currently resides in Colorado Springs. She received a BFA degree from the Kansas City Art Institute, where she graduated second in her class. She has exhibited her artwork in solo exhibitions at the Buell Children’s Museum in Pueblo, Colorado; the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, the Denver Botanic Gardens, and the Sangre de Cristo Arts Center in Pueblo, Colorado. She has participated in group exhibitions at the Berkshire Museum in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, the Center for Visual Art in Denver, Colorado; the Denver Art Museum, the Gallery of Contemporary Art at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, the Harwood Museum of Art in Taos, New Mexico, and the Japanese American National Museum in Los Angeles, California. Her paintings and drawings have been exhibited in gallery shows throughout the United States and in Toronto, Canada. In addition to the inclusion in private and corporate collections, her artwork has been selected for public commissions including a mural for the Town of Castle Rock, Colorado Police Department and Municipal Court Facility; and paint design for the production of Anton Chekhov’s, “The Seagull”, at Theatreworks, Colorado Springs, CO. Her artwork is in the permanent collection of the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center. She is represented by Michael Warren Contemporary in Denver, Colorado. 

“My work is an exploration of identity. I’m responding to daily life, serendipitous connections, and the poetry of everyday things. My perspectives on identity encompass thoughts from unity and belonging, a sense of place and the passage of time, to ideas regarding the mutability of identity itself. I love the process of discovery and looking for what’s possible. I’m searching for the essence of things.

The Notation series of drawings are contemplative works that bring voice to the quiet moments of everyday life. They are spaces to share observations, discover interconnectedness and reveal innermost thoughts. The small scale encourages careful looking and reflects the intimate and introspective nature of the work. 

“Poems & Fragments” is a selection of work inspired by everyday experiences and observations – from calm familiar routine to wildly unprecedented events. The pieces were created in the spirit of sharing personal perspectives and in seeing familiar objects in unexpected ways. I’m celebrating the beauty and symbolic strength of individual grains of rice, relating coronavirus concerns through pins and thread, and expressing our connected humanity and everyday wonder with humble pencil. I’m drawn to the relatability and honesty of commonplace things and delight in revealing their expressive potential.” 

www.margaretkasahara.com @mkasahara_art 

 

Modern Storytellers by JayCee Beyale and Gregg Deal

Modern Storytellers by JayCee Beyale and Gregg Deal

The Modbo is excited to present a short and modified First Friday experience for August: Modern Storytellers by JayCee Beyale and Gregg Deal.  The opening reception is from 5 pm until 8 pm on Friday, August 7th.  During opening hours, guests must wear masks inside the space, and will only be allowed in a few people at a time.  The show runs through Friday, August 28th. In addition to the opening reception, the gallery is open by appointment or via personalized FaceTime tour.  The Modbo is located in the Arts Alley in downtown Colorado Springs at 17C E. Bijou. Find the stretch of Bijou that is between Cascade and Tejon, and go south down the alley. Street parking is available, but The Modbo recommends the lot on Cascade just north of Bijou, which is only $1 after 3 pm. The Modbo can be reached at themodbo@gmail.com, themodbo.com, or 633-4240.

JayCee Beyale grew up in the Four Corners area of New Mexico, and received his BFA in printmaking from the University of New Mexico.  He currently manages a screen printing and embroidery shop in Colorado Springs and often participates in collaborative murals and other art projects with fellow organizations and artists.  JayCee’s connection to his aboriginal culture is heavily influenced by his involvement in the arts; his personal identity and background have always been present in his work because he is proud of who he is and where he comes from.  His career as an artist started when he discovered street art and graffiti. He is deeply influenced by music, and is certain that without music, his art would not exist.  Combining traditional indigenous ideologies and his personal Buddhist practice, JayCee is always striving to emphasize the concepts and convictions in his art.  Using a combination of spray paints and acrylics, he hopes to share his beliefs by celebrating the fusion of technology and Indigenous culture in his work. JayCee aspires to illustrate the Laws of Movement, Unity and Impermanence in his work.

Gregg Deal (Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe) is a provocative contemporary artist who challenges Western perceptions of Indigenous people, touching on issues of race, history and stereotypes. Through his work—paintings, murals, performance art, filmmaking and spoken word—Deal critically examines issues and tells stories of decolonization and appropriation that affect Indian country. Deal’s activism exists in his art, as well as his participation in political movements

We Aren’t Closing, But We Aren’t Open

Dear Kind (and kindof) Art Supporters,

First off, I promise The Modbo isn’t closing.  But we are on an indefinite hiatus due to mandatory corona virus inspired closures.  April and May’s First Fridays are definitely postponed.  And, it’s probably obvious, we don’t have any open hours right now.  As soon as I am able to legally schedule a First Friday opening, I will do so, and I’ll update that information here.  In the meantime, we do not currently have an e-commerce platform, though if you are seeking a connection to any artist I’ve shown in the past, I’m happy to make it for you.  If you’re itching to do some good, you could always give The Modbo a good rating on google or facebook.  Then I’ll have more good ratings, and I’ll like you more.  Thanks for thinking of us, if you were, and good luck to you and yours, until we meet again.

You (still) Need Art.  Art (still) Needs You.

Lauren

it’s the small things: new art by josh cantalope

it’s the small things: new art by josh cantalope

The Modbo presents March’s First Friday: “it’s the little things,” by josh cantalope.  Josh uses thinned acrylic paints and an abundance of tape, creating sharp, modernist lines and stark depictions.  The opening reception is from 5 pm until 11 pm on Friday, March 6th. The show runs through Friday, March 27th. In addition to the opening reception, the gallery is open on Friday evenings from 4-7 pm or by appointment.  The Modbo is located in the Arts Alley in downtown Colorado Springs at 17C E. Bijou. Find the stretch of Bijou that is between Cascade and Tejon, and go south down the alley. Street parking is available, but The Modbo recommends the lot on Cascade just north of Bijou, which is only $1 after 3 pm. The Modbo can be reached at themodbo@gmail.com, themodbo.com, or 633-4240. 

Initially using painting as an outlet to establish a legacy, it’s been a trial and error based progression to develop the current style Josh ‘Cantalope’ Castillo prides himself on. With roots based in South Texas, Josh later found himself in Colorado, where not only was the change of style evident, but so was the inspiration. With the help from talented photographer friends, vintage signs that line the weird mountain town he resides, or just a photo taken while traveling, Josh uses thinned acrylic paints and an abundance of tape to give seemingly small moments a lifetime of recognition. 

Not interested in cliches or being perceived as “deep,” Josh simply paints what he wants. Whether that’s inspired by his cat longing to put her instincts to use or just a man reading the local paper, Josh hopes the pieces in this show may trigger a familiar, if not nostalgic, feeling within the viewer, helping us take into consideration that sometimes everyday life deserves to be glorified.