UPCOMING EVENTS

Find out what we’ll be showing at the Modbo soon. Check out artists, plan your night in Colorado Springs, and be the first in line to buy the best pieces!

Vetted by Lew: Works by the Late Lew Tilley

Vetted by Lew: Works by the Late Lew Tilley

The Modbo presents “Vetted by Lew,” an exhibition of works by the late artist Lew Tilley. The opening reception is from 5 pm until 9 pm on Friday, November 5th.  This show features works that Lew chose himself to be framed and exhibited.  As of this writing, masks are suggested for unvaccinated viewers.  The show runs through Friday, November 19th. In addition to the opening reception, the gallery is happily open by appointment.  The Modbo is located in the Arts Alley in downtown Colorado Springs at 17C E. Bijou. Find the stretch of Bijou that is between Cascade and Tejon, and go south down the alley. Street parking is available, but The Modbo recommends the lot on Cascade just north of Bijou. The Modbo can be reached at themodbo@gmail.com, themodbo.com, or 633-4240.

About Lew Tilley:

Lewis Lee Tilley III, painter, poet, printmaker, photographer, illustrator, watercolorist, animator, filmmaker, writer, graphic designer, computer art expert, scholar, experimental architect, actor, set designer, raconteur, gourmet cook, jazz fan and world traveler, was born in Parrott, Georgia, May 17, 1921. Lew was an artist from the beginning; his mother could always tell where he had spent his day by peeking in his sketchbook.  He began his professional career in 1937 at the High Museum of Art in Athens, Georgia, studying with Lamar Dodd, Jean Charlot, and John Held Jr., and came to the Pikes Peak Region in the summer of 1938 to study with Boardman Robinson, Adolph Dehn and Lawrence Barrett. Lew received his B.F.A. from the University of Georgia in 1942 and returned for the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center Art School eventually to become an instructor in painting, drawing, printmaking and design at the FAC Art School and the Colorado College.

A gypsy at heart, in 1952, Tilley took a sabbatical from the FAC, and moved his young family to San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato, Mexico, where he bought his first camera and added photography to his repertoire. Shortly after he returned to Colorado Springs, the FAC abandoned The Art School and he became a freelance artist, writer, teacher, muralist and photographer. This interest led to filmmaking, and from 1958 to 1962 he was writer-producer-director at Alexander Film Company.

In 1962, Tilley took a two-year tour of duty with USAID in Kaduna, Nigeria, working with the British Ministry of Education and the Peace Corps. He returned to be professor of art at the University of Southern Colorado (now CSU Pueblo) where he worked from 1965 until his retirement in 1985. Lew spent several sabbaticals from USC touring Europe and the British Isles and spent one fall semester leading a student tour in Cortona, Italy. Meanwhile, he spent several summers at the Instituto de Allende in San Miguel for his M.F.A. in printmaking (1968) from the University of Guanajuato, Mexico, through the University of Colorado. He was also a pioneer in computer art and wrote articles and designed covers for the British publication, “Your Amiga Magazine” in the late 1980’s and early ‘90’s.

His many accolades include winning the purchase prize at the inaugural Canon City Blossom Festival (the first arts festival of its kind in the country), where he completed the circle returning as judge for their 50th anniversary. At USC, he was voted “Outstanding Faculty Member” for 1979-1980 and also won an annual co-eds’ “Male Chauvinist Pig” award. Lew Tilley died in Colorado Springs, October 4, 2005.

Artist Talk and Closing Reception for Su Kaiden Cho’s “I was, I am, I will be”

Artist Talk and Closing Reception for Su Kaiden Cho’s “I was, I am, I will be”

Please join us for an artist talk and closing reception for Su Kaiden Cho to celebrate his beautiful show, “I was, I am, I will be.” Free. The talk portion will begin at 5.

ALSO, IMPORTANT INFO REGARDING HOURS: For the remaining Fridays of the show, Su will be opening the gallery from 5-9 pm. Please stop by, enjoy the beautiful work, and allow him to regale you with its deep meaning.

More about the show:

Su Kaiden Cho condenses a central belief that lies at the core of his artistic practice by delving into issues of ethnic liminality by means of quality of ambiguity or disorientation of identity. Cho’s series of “I was,” “I am,” “I will be,” are the connections to his heritage but are also reminders of the loss of identity he has had to endure. The first phrase “I was,” is dormant, because the past is fixed. You can’t change it and you can’t manipulate it in any way. The second phrase,“I was,” is present. In the present is the only time we need to center ourselves. As for the last, “I will be,” references moving forward to whatever may come into its life. Cho explores in the combination of Asian art with contemporary art to portray the traditional Korean silk wrapping (Bojagi) and its abstract form as a metaphor for coverings of how we lose ourselves, what we keep inside, and how it is reflected. Cho sees this exhibit as an opportunity for any viewers to fill in those phrases with their own experiences, and to take the time to reflect on their own life trajectory –Cho states that the truth is hardly ever on the surface, more often than not, the truth can only be found deep inside.

About the Artist:

Su Kaiden Cho was born and raised in Seoul, South Korea. Cho is a Korean contemporary artist and he now resides and works in Colorado. Cho’s oeuvre reconciles the identity challenges reflecting his life experiences caught in between South Korean customs and American mores. Cho received a Bachelor of Arts in Interdisciplinary Arts Practices with emphasis in installation arts from University of Colorado, Colorado Springs. Cho has exhibited his work in numerous galleries in Colorado including solo exhibitions and artist in residency. Cho was shown as a featured artist in Gallery of Contemporary Arts, Colorado Springs, CO, Understudy, Denver, Colorado, Artworks Center for Contemporary Art, Loveland, Denver, installed public sculpture in Aurora, Colorado, and an award winning designer at the Fine Arts Center in Colorado Springs, CO.

Su Kaiden Cho condenses a central belief that lies at the core of his artistic practice by delving into issues of ethnic liminality by means of quality of ambiguity or disorientation of identity. Cho’s practice to bring in otherness, acceptance, challenging norms and inclusion. In his work, he confronts the derogatory terms and attitudes with which Cho continues to withstand today. His accoutrements are proud connections to his heritage but are also reminders of the loss of identity he has had to endure. Cho manipulates materials through the context of self-identity as he examines with social and cultural clashes between what is internally embraced and externally imposed, as it pertains to race and ethnic identity. Being considered a minority in this culture causes a level of uncertainty regarding his own identity and beauty. Cho’s work raises questions about common standpoints in how beauty is perceived that then ultimately results in internalized self-deprecation among minority races through visual duality, ambiguity, combing the association with the grotesque, the extreme and the fantastic —Cho states that the truth is hardly ever on the surface, more often than not, the truth can only be found deep inside.

I was, I am, I will be: New Work by Su Kaiden Cho

I was, I am, I will be: New Work by Su Kaiden Cho

The Modbo presents “I was, I am, I will be,” an exhibition of fascinating mixed media by contemporary artist Su Kaiden Cho.  The opening reception is from 5 pm until 9 pm on Friday, October 1st.  Cho explores in the combination of Asian art with contemporary art to portray the traditional Korean silk wrapping (Bojagi) and its abstract form as a metaphor for coverings of how we lose ourselves, what we keep inside, and how it is reflected. As of this writing, masks are suggested for unvaccinated viewers.  The show runs through Friday, October 29th. In addition to the opening reception, the gallery is happily open by appointment.  The Modbo is located in the Arts Alley in downtown Colorado Springs at 17C E. Bijou. Find the stretch of Bijou that is between Cascade and Tejon, and go south down the alley. Street parking is available, but The Modbo recommends the lot on Cascade just north of Bijou. The Modbo can be reached at themodbo@gmail.com, themodbo.com, or 633-4240.

About the Show:

Su Kaiden Cho condenses a central belief that lies at the core of his artistic practice by delving into issues of ethnic liminality by means of quality of ambiguity or disorientation of identity. Cho’s series of “I was,” “I am,” “I will be,” are the connections to his heritage but are also reminders of the loss of identity he has had to endure. The first phrase “I was,” is dormant, because the past is fixed. You can’t change it and you can’t manipulate it in any way. The second phrase,“I was,” is present. In the present is the only time we need to center ourselves. As for the last, “I will be,” references moving forward to whatever may come into its life. Cho explores in the combination of Asian art with contemporary art to portray the traditional Korean silk wrapping (Bojagi) and its abstract form as a metaphor for coverings of how we lose ourselves, what we keep inside, and how it is reflected. Cho sees this exhibit as an opportunity for any viewers to fill in those phrases with their own experiences, and to take the time to reflect on their own life trajectory –Cho states that the truth is hardly ever on the surface, more often than not, the truth can only be found deep inside.

About the Artist:

Su Kaiden Cho was born and raised in Seoul, South Korea. Cho is a Korean contemporary artist and he now resides and works in Colorado. Cho’s oeuvre reconciles the identity challenges reflecting his life experiences caught in between South Korean customs and American mores. Cho received a Bachelor of Arts in Interdisciplinary Arts Practices with emphasis in installation arts from University of Colorado, Colorado Springs. Cho has exhibited his work in numerous galleries in Colorado including solo exhibitions and artist in residency. Cho was shown as a featured artist in Gallery of Contemporary Arts, Colorado Springs, CO, Understudy, Denver, Colorado, Artworks Center for Contemporary Art, Loveland, Denver, installed public sculpture in Aurora, Colorado, and an award winning designer at the Fine Arts Center in Colorado Springs, CO.

Su Kaiden Cho condenses a central belief that lies at the core of his artistic practice by delving into issues of ethnic liminality by means of quality of ambiguity or disorientation of identity. Cho’s practice to bring in otherness, acceptance, challenging norms and inclusion. In his work, he confronts the derogatory terms and attitudes with which Cho continues to withstand today. His accoutrements are proud connections to his heritage but are also reminders of the loss of identity he has had to endure. Cho manipulates materials through the context of self-identity as he examines with social and cultural clashes between what is internally embraced and externally imposed, as it pertains to race and ethnic identity. Being considered a minority in this culture causes a level of uncertainty regarding his own identity and beauty. Cho’s work raises questions about common standpoints in how beauty is perceived that then ultimately results in internalized self-deprecation among minority races through visual duality, ambiguity, combing the association with the grotesque, the extreme and the fantastic —Cho states that the truth is hardly ever on the surface, more often than not, the truth can only be found deep inside.

Feathers and Fables by Emma Powell

Feathers and Fables by Emma Powell

The Modbo presents “Feathers and Fables,” an exhibition of photographs by Emma Powell.  The opening reception is from 5 pm until 9 pm on Friday, September 3rd, with live music by My Name is Harriett at 7:30 pm.  As of this writing, masks are suggested for unvaccinated viewers.  The show runs through Friday, September 24th. In addition to the opening reception, the gallery is happily open by appointment.  The Modbo is located in the Arts Alley in downtown Colorado Springs at 17C E. Bijou. Find the stretch of Bijou that is between Cascade and Tejon, and go south down the alley. Street parking is available, but The Modbo recommends the lot on Cascade just north of Bijou. The Modbo can be reached at themodbo@gmail.com, themodbo.com, or 633-4240.

Feathers and Fables is an exhibition of photographs that tell ambiguous stories, reminiscent of long-forgotten fairytales. Within these dreamlike scenes, animals are symbols, as well as characters. Emma Powell prints her artworks by hand using alternative and historic photographic processes in order to emphasize their illustrative nature and to explore the materiality of her photographs. 

Emma Powell received her MFA in photography from Rochester Institute of Technology. Powell lives in Colorado Springs and has taught photography at Colorado College, as well as Iowa State University. She has also been an instructor, leading alternative process photography workshops at Penland School of Crafts, and other educational institutions. Powell’s artwork has been exhibited widely including at the Fox Talbot Museum, Lacock Abbey, England, Panopticon Gallery, Boston, and Colorado Photographic Arts Center, Denver. 

My Scenery: Work by Byeongdoo Moon

My Scenery: Work by Byeongdoo Moon

The Modbo is surprised and delighted to host “My Scenery”– a last minute show of gorgeous sculptures by internationally renowned artist ByeongDoo Moon, accompanied by fascinating textile pieces by his wife, Hyewon Sim.  Although known locally for his large, beautiful outdoor pieces in downtown Colorado Springs, this show will instead feature smaller works by the artist.  The opening reception is from 5 pm until 9 pm on Friday, August 6th.  As of this writing, masks are suggested for unvaccinated viewers.  The show runs through Friday, August 27th. In addition to the opening reception, the gallery is happily open by appointment.  The Modbo is located in the Arts Alley in downtown Colorado Springs at 17C E. Bijou. Find the stretch of Bijou that is between Cascade and Tejon, and go south down the alley. Street parking is available, but The Modbo recommends the lot on Cascade just north of Bijou, which costs $3. The Modbo can be reached at themodbo@gmail.com, themodbo.com, or 633-4240.

Originally from South Korea, sculptor Byeongdoo Moon moved his family to Colorado Springs at the end of November.  Having exhibited numerous pieces in Colorado Springs’ Art on the Streets, he was moved by the city’s response to his work.  Most recently, his piece “Air or Water,” located at the Plaza of the Rockies building, was the third place winner for Art on the Streets.  Using stainless steel wire, Byeongdoo’s exquisitely crafted work speaks to the interdependence of humans and nature.  

And I said hey. What’s going on?

Hello, all! The Modbo is taking another brief hiatus, but you can look for two STELLAR shows in September and October by Emma Powell and Su Kaiden Cho, respectively. Stay tuned for more info!

June’s First Friday: Louis Rodriguez

June’s First Friday: Louis Rodriguez

The Modbo proudly presents June’s First Friday exhibit: “Experiments through Color Geometries and the Human Element,” featuring gorgeous paintings by Louis Rodriguez.  The opening reception is from 5 pm until 9 pm on Friday, June 4th.  Masks are no longer required for vaccinated people.  The show runs through Friday, June 25th. In addition to the opening reception, the gallery is open every Friday this month from 5-8 pm or by appointment.  The Modbo is located in the Arts Alley in downtown Colorado Springs at 17C E. Bijou. Find the stretch of Bijou that is between Cascade and Tejon, and go south down the alley. Street parking is available, but The Modbo recommends the lot on Cascade just north of Bijou, which costs $3. The Modbo can be reached at themodbo@gmail.com, themodbo.com, or 633-4240.

Louis Rodriguez is an artist and designer. His approach to painting is shaped by color, texture and contrast, which is evidenced in his current body of work. He favors the figurative form, abstraction, and landscapes and incorporates all three subjects in his painting. His journey and development as an artist has taken many twists and turns. From as far back as he can remember, he sensed art would be his lifelong adventure. The stops along the way have included design for advertising, commercial and fashion illustration, digital imaging, and a brief dabbling in motion graphics and video editing. “Moving forward in my commitment to art, into the next chapter of my life, represents a current state of expression focused from within and into the contemporary art world. It has been a deep personal quest and has become a determined lifelong endeavor to express the things that stir inside.” This is a natural process that is constantly evolving inside his core with self expression, enlightenment, and passionate love for contemporary art.

A Show Featuring All of the Unclaimed Art That Has Ended up in The Modbo Closet of Shame Since 2009

A Show Featuring All of the Unclaimed Art That Has Ended up in The Modbo Closet of Shame Since 2009

The Modbo is not too proud to present October’s First Friday exhibit: “All of the Unclaimed Art That Has Ended up in The Modbo Closet of Shame Since 2009.”  This is a show featuring all the unclaimed art that has ended up in The Modbo closet of shame since 2009.  The opening reception is from 5 pm until 8 pm on Friday,October 2nd.  During opening hours, guests must wear masks inside the space, and will only be allowed in a few people at a time.  The show runs through Friday, October 30th. In addition to the opening reception, the gallery is open by appointment or via personalized FaceTime tour.  The Modbo is located in the Arts Alley in downtown Colorado Springs at 17C E. Bijou. Find the stretch of Bijou that is between Cascade and Tejon, and go south down the alley. Street parking is available, but The Modbo recommends the lot on Cascade just north of Bijou, which is only $1 after 3 pm. The Modbo can be reached at themodbo@gmail.com, themodbo.com, or 633-4240.

Poems & Fragments: Art by Margaret Kasahara in September

Poems & Fragments: Art by Margaret Kasahara in September

The Modbo proudly presents September’s First Friday exhibit: “Poems & Fragments” by Margaret Kasahara.  The opening reception is from 5 pm until 8 pm on Friday, September 4th.  During opening hours, guests must wear masks inside the space, and will only be allowed in a few people at a time.  The show runs through Friday, September 25th. In addition to the opening reception, the gallery is open by appointment or via personalized FaceTime tour.  The Modbo is located in the Arts Alley in downtown Colorado Springs at 17C E. Bijou. Find the stretch of Bijou that is between Cascade and Tejon, and go south down the alley. Street parking is available, but The Modbo recommends the lot on Cascade just north of Bijou, which is only $1 after 3 pm. The Modbo can be reached at themodbo@gmail.com, themodbo.com, or 633-4240.

Margaret Kasahara was born in New York City, raised in Boulder, Colorado and currently resides in Colorado Springs. She received a BFA degree from the Kansas City Art Institute, where she graduated second in her class. She has exhibited her artwork in solo exhibitions at the Buell Children’s Museum in Pueblo, Colorado; the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, the Denver Botanic Gardens, and the Sangre de Cristo Arts Center in Pueblo, Colorado. She has participated in group exhibitions at the Berkshire Museum in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, the Center for Visual Art in Denver, Colorado; the Denver Art Museum, the Gallery of Contemporary Art at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, the Harwood Museum of Art in Taos, New Mexico, and the Japanese American National Museum in Los Angeles, California. Her paintings and drawings have been exhibited in gallery shows throughout the United States and in Toronto, Canada. In addition to the inclusion in private and corporate collections, her artwork has been selected for public commissions including a mural for the Town of Castle Rock, Colorado Police Department and Municipal Court Facility; and paint design for the production of Anton Chekhov’s, “The Seagull”, at Theatreworks, Colorado Springs, CO. Her artwork is in the permanent collection of the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center. She is represented by Michael Warren Contemporary in Denver, Colorado. 

“My work is an exploration of identity. I’m responding to daily life, serendipitous connections, and the poetry of everyday things. My perspectives on identity encompass thoughts from unity and belonging, a sense of place and the passage of time, to ideas regarding the mutability of identity itself. I love the process of discovery and looking for what’s possible. I’m searching for the essence of things.

The Notation series of drawings are contemplative works that bring voice to the quiet moments of everyday life. They are spaces to share observations, discover interconnectedness and reveal innermost thoughts. The small scale encourages careful looking and reflects the intimate and introspective nature of the work. 

“Poems & Fragments” is a selection of work inspired by everyday experiences and observations – from calm familiar routine to wildly unprecedented events. The pieces were created in the spirit of sharing personal perspectives and in seeing familiar objects in unexpected ways. I’m celebrating the beauty and symbolic strength of individual grains of rice, relating coronavirus concerns through pins and thread, and expressing our connected humanity and everyday wonder with humble pencil. I’m drawn to the relatability and honesty of commonplace things and delight in revealing their expressive potential.” 

www.margaretkasahara.com @mkasahara_art 

 

Modern Storytellers by JayCee Beyale and Gregg Deal

Modern Storytellers by JayCee Beyale and Gregg Deal

The Modbo is excited to present a short and modified First Friday experience for August: Modern Storytellers by JayCee Beyale and Gregg Deal.  The opening reception is from 5 pm until 8 pm on Friday, August 7th.  During opening hours, guests must wear masks inside the space, and will only be allowed in a few people at a time.  The show runs through Friday, August 28th. In addition to the opening reception, the gallery is open by appointment or via personalized FaceTime tour.  The Modbo is located in the Arts Alley in downtown Colorado Springs at 17C E. Bijou. Find the stretch of Bijou that is between Cascade and Tejon, and go south down the alley. Street parking is available, but The Modbo recommends the lot on Cascade just north of Bijou, which is only $1 after 3 pm. The Modbo can be reached at themodbo@gmail.com, themodbo.com, or 633-4240.

JayCee Beyale grew up in the Four Corners area of New Mexico, and received his BFA in printmaking from the University of New Mexico.  He currently manages a screen printing and embroidery shop in Colorado Springs and often participates in collaborative murals and other art projects with fellow organizations and artists.  JayCee’s connection to his aboriginal culture is heavily influenced by his involvement in the arts; his personal identity and background have always been present in his work because he is proud of who he is and where he comes from.  His career as an artist started when he discovered street art and graffiti. He is deeply influenced by music, and is certain that without music, his art would not exist.  Combining traditional indigenous ideologies and his personal Buddhist practice, JayCee is always striving to emphasize the concepts and convictions in his art.  Using a combination of spray paints and acrylics, he hopes to share his beliefs by celebrating the fusion of technology and Indigenous culture in his work. JayCee aspires to illustrate the Laws of Movement, Unity and Impermanence in his work.

Gregg Deal (Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe) is a provocative contemporary artist who challenges Western perceptions of Indigenous people, touching on issues of race, history and stereotypes. Through his work—paintings, murals, performance art, filmmaking and spoken word—Deal critically examines issues and tells stories of decolonization and appropriation that affect Indian country. Deal’s activism exists in his art, as well as his participation in political movements